vegan-or-not-vegan-honey

Are You Still A Vegan If You Eat Honey

A couple of day ago, while enjoying a delicious vegan lunch with my friends, we stumbled upon an interesting conversation. As one of my friends ordered tea with honey, my other friend (vegan for 2 months now) asked a question that made me open Safari and search on Google.

I am not a big honey lover. As a matter of fact, I do not like any kind of sugary products and sweeteners. So, I’ve never really thought about whether or not honey is considered an animal product.

The Answer

A quick Google search returned a quick answer. No, you are not vegan if you eat honey. Donald Watson said so. Therefore it is true. I mean, the man coined the term “vegan”. He also gave us a clear definition of what it means to be one. One of his quotes clearly states that veganism “applies to the practice of living on the products of the plant kingdom to the exclusion flesh, fish, eggs, honey, animal milk and its derivatives, and encourages alternatives for all commodities derived wholly or in part from animals”.

I mean, that answer was as straight forward as they come.

However, modern language and definitions are a bit different than they were in 1944. The vegan community seems to be torn apart when it comes to honey. The argument surrounds the fact that honey is made by bees, but it is made out of plants. Also, it is bees’ natural way of life. They make money regardless of human exploitation.

When the blooming season comes, honeybees leave their hives and fly around to find flowers and collect nectar. Sure, humans have managed to make a business out of it. Sure, humans have added this to their capitalistic machine of never-ending growth and monetary profit. However, this is what bees would have been doing regardless. Perhaps, on a smaller scale.

Once collected, the nectar is brought back home, to the honeycombs. There, the real magic happens. Everything is broken down into simple sugars and stored. During that process there is a constant fanning within the hive that instigates evaporation and creates liquid gold. Also known as honey.

Manuka honey, and all other kinds of honey are created the same way. This is, before they are placed into jars and mixed up with a bunch of chemicals, of course. As a matter of fact, there are some highly recommended manuka honey reviews that everyone should read, before they go out spending money on such products.

Back to the production line.

Human interference occurs in the form of beekeeping. Humane beekeepers make sure that their hives are not starving, and only remove the excessive honey. Because, surprise, surprise, bees also eat honey. Actually, this is all they eat.

Honeybees are considered arthropods, much like lobsters. This unquestionably makes them animals. However, honey comes from plants and honeycombs. In a way, bees grow and produce their honey the same way we (humans) grow our corn.

So, I will leave you with that. To me, it is a personal choice whether or not a vegan chooses to eat honey.

3 Must Have Vitamins When Becoming A Vegan

So, you are thinking of trying out the vegan life. Good for you! But, let me tell you, it is not as easy as not eating chocolate for a week or month. There are a lot of food factors that you need to consider when becoming a vegan.

Bereaving your body from animal products should only be done once you understand the vegan lifestyle. In order to supplement the vitamins and minerals that come from meat and dairy products, you need to be very familiar with the vegetarian world.

Here is what you need to expect before you throw yourself on the vegan bandwagon next to Jay-Z and Beyonce.

B12 Supplement

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All pro-meat slogans include Vitamin B12 in them. This vitamins is mostly prevalent in animal foods, and therefore, very hard to stack up on if you are giving these foods away. B12 carries out some crucial body functions, such as keeping the blood cells healthy, creating DNA, and making sure your organism is not tired.

Lack of Vitamin B12 can often lead to visible tiredness, weakness, nerve problems and even in some cases depression. Being deficient in B12 can stimulate muscle loss as well. Also known as bad weight loss.

A simple blood test can quickly show if you are low on B12. So, the first thing you want to do when switching to a vegan diet is to stock up on B12-fortified foods and supplements. One such food can be fortified almond milk.

Iron Man/Woman

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Inadequate amount of iron can lead to a type of anemia. In fact, this is the most prevalent and common type of deficiencies among children and women.

Lack of iron has been proven to cause a wide range of health problems. The most widespread in modern society are varieties of digestive and gastrointestinal diseases as well as impaired cognitive function.

See, iron is split into two categories: heme and non-heme. Heme is the type of iron that our bodies can absorb effortlessly. This is also the type that makes up around 40 percent of the iron in food and other animal products.

Vegan foods are comprised only of non-heme iron, which science has demonstrated to be harder to absorb by the body. For this reason, not only will you have to consume more iron on a daily basis. But, you will also need to up your Vitamin C uptake. The reason being is that Vitamin C rich foods can help the body break down and absorb iron.

Protein

got-protein

I am sure you have heard this one before. Proteins are essential to promoting healthy cells and repairing our bodies. It is no secret that animal products are very rich on protein. So, if you are giving up animal foods, you will have to look elsewhere for your 50-80 grams of daily protein intake.

There are some good and rich sources of vegan protein, such as, lentils, beans, soy and quinoa. However, some of them might be hard on your stomach at first. But, once you get used to and make the complete change, you will love it.

How Vegans Save

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